Category Archives: design

Socks for big damn heroes

Ladies and gentlemen, I promised a full update when my new sock patterns were up for online consumption, and I’m pleased to finally do so!

Hi, I’m a geek. Have we met? I mean, sure I love artsy things, and inspiration can and does come from everywhere. But sometimes, my friends, that inspiration is television. I like television. I like other things, too, but you know, I like television. And I like talking about it. I never understand it when people watch a show every week and then don’t feel the urge to go blather about it (or via email, since, as established, I’m a geek) with a friend the next day. Working with said inspiration is also pretty easy when you are working with yarn dyed by friends who share said television geekery. Last winter I did some mitten patterns with Kim’s yarn, inspired by her Buffy-the-Vampire-Slayer themed colourways, and this summer I’ve been at work on a few sock patterns which are all named for Firefly characters. (It took me a while to come around on Firefly, and why I should care to go watch a show that only lasted one season. Then I got the DVDs and discovered why. It’s awesome.)

The mittens and gloves came in a set of 3 (one for each weight of Merino/cashmere/nylon yarn), so somehow it seemed natural that the Firefly socks should also come in a set of 3. (one for each…kind of sock yarn? Sure!) So then I had to pick three characters to work with, and it turned out that was the easy part. I present to you, officially launched online, three Firefly-inspired sock patterns – all worked for 2 sizes, all designed with Indigodragonfly Yarns in mind. (If substituting, work with a yarn that will allow you to obtain the same gauge.) Each are available for individual sale on Patternfish and Ravelry, for $6. If you’re purchasing on Ravelry, you can get all 3 as a collection, for the price of 2. (Links below).

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These are called “O Captain My Captain”, for Captain Malcolm Reynolds, and are worked in the most practical of sock yarns – superwash merino 2-ply. I love this yarn, it’s the same one I worked with for my “Staked” sock pattern last fall, and is very versatile. I envisioned these socks as being the ones as potentially for either men or women, so I wanted to keep the lines simple but still with a bit of excitement to them – much like Mal himself. But as noble as Mal is, he’s also a little bit broken and twisted, so that’s exactly what these cables do. There are instructions on how to “place” the cable breaks, and that placement is entirely up to you. You could break the same cable in the same place all the way down the foot, or alternate around the leg.

July25-Mal1

On Ravelry | On Patternfish

These are worked from the cuff down at a stockinette gauge of 8 sts/inch, on 2.5mm needles, and socks to fit up to a size 12 women’s or size 10 men’s foot should be fine with one 375 yds/100g skein of the Merino sock.

July25-Kaylee1

Next up is “Kaywinnit”, for Kaylee, who is most at home in the ship’s engine room but still longs for girlish frills and pink ruffles. So, I wanted a sock that would be relatively simple, but still with a bit of frills. I hope to have accomplished that with these, where there is a chevron/garter “ruffle” at the top of the cuff.

July25-Kaylee2

On Ravelry | On Patternfish

These are also cuff-down, and once you’re past the cuff it’s pretty smooth sailing with a knit-and-purl textured pattern down the rest of the foot, and if you’re lucky to snag some of the Shiny Sock (includes silver) while it’s still going, you can also look forward to a few sparkles! This sock yarn behaves a little more like sport-weight, so even on 2.5mm needles this pattern assumes a stockinette gauge of 7 sts/inch. If substituting yarns, look for something a little heavier than your usual sock yarn.

Finally, for the fanciest lady on the Firefly ship, these are called “Companion.” Plain socks wouldn’t do for Inara, I mean, have you seen the number of silk gowns she has to parade around in? No no, even just cables wouldn’t do. This gal needs some beads as well. So, after a few years of wanting to play with beads, I finally broke them out for Inara – this is my first beaded sock design.

July25-Inara4b

If you’re not inclined towards beads, they are easily omitted from this sock – and you’ll still have a few twisted cables to keep your interest – as they are placed with a crochet hook and not pre-strung. You’ll also need to pay attention to your “stopping place” with the beads, i.e. don’t go right to the toe. Stop placing the beads once you reach the point when your shoe is going to come into the picture. I have to say, though, I really like the elegance and extra bit of sparkle they add.

On Ravelry | On Patternfish

These are also worked cuff-down, and are the most advanced of this little collection, involving twisted-stitch cables as well as the bead placement. But if you’ve got experience with that sort of thing, you’ll find yourself getting into a rhythm pretty easily. They also assume a stockinette gauge of 8 sts/inch, and are worked using Indigodragonfly Merino/cashmere/nylon sock.

July25-Inara3

My goal with this little set of socks was to come up with a set of patterns that was not only consistent with the Firefly character aesthetics, but which also used a variety of techniques for a variety of skill levels or interests. Each pattern does something a little bit differently than the other. I hope you’ll find one (or two?) in there that sparks your interest!

These days, my needles are full of projects and ideas, so with any luck this fall will have more designs coming your way. Socks are for all occasion, but sweaters and other accessories are just the ticket for cool weather, so those are in the plans for sure.

I’ve also got to find something new for a regular not-designed-by-me project, so that’s something I’ll put my mind to in the next few days. Until next time, happy knitting!

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Filed under design, fandom, socks

Pretty cunning, don’t you think?

I’ve been getting steadily busier the last couple of months here at Knitting to Stay Sane, with designs and designs-still-being-dreamed up. I have a list of sweater plans the length of my arm. At least two shawls. And no fewer than two Harry Potter inspired knits, now that the final film has been released and reminded me of how fun that sort of knitting is. (Neville’s cardigan, man am I ever ON IT when Sock Summit is over. Plotting has begun.)

Speaking of Sock Summit, I have the great fortune to have three designs that will be winging their way to Portland along with me. These are the Firefly-inspired knits I alluded to a week or two earlier, and I am well pleased with them. They’ll be making their debut in the Indigodragonfly booth (#1001), and then in full release online via Ravelry and Patternfish some time in early August. (In other words, when I’ve had a few days to recover from Sock Summit, and let the SS shoppers have a few days of exclusivity and glee. ;) ) So if you’re headed to Sock Summit, these can all be yours this week! If not, I’ll be sure to give the heads-up on this blog when they are available for all.

So dear readers, I am pleased to give you a sneak peek of the Firefly-inspired sock patterns that will soon be making their way out into knitting world, each showcasing a different yarn and different set of techniques.

‘O Captain My Captain’ is for Mal, and features not just noble, upright cables…but broken ones, too. Broken cables for a broken guy. These ones are intended for either men or women, and are shown in the ‘Captain Tightpants’ colourway of Indigodragonfly Merino Sock.

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‘Kaywinnit’ is for Kaylee, and uses simple stitches and texture for a combination of practicality and frill. Our shiny gal deserves a bit of both in her life, don’t you think?

July25-Kaylee1

And finally, ‘Companion’ is for Inara, to whom I gave not just my precious twisted cables – no no, she deserves just a little bit more – but the application of a few beads. The beads are optional, but so darned gorgeous. And her yarn is the merino/nylon/cashmere, no less. Doesn’t a space geisha deserve that extra luxury?

July25-Inara2

I’m very happy to show you these socks, as they’ve been waiting patiently for a while.
And now, I’d better get back to the grind – there’s not just knitting but packing to be done!
Happy Monday!

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Filed under design, fandom, finished object: socks

Things I’ve been doing

I’ve been short in the blogging this week, but not in the to-do-ings. Things I’ve been keeping busy with include:

1. Finishing up some sock designs for Indigodragonfly, to appear in her booth at Sock Summit 2011, in just 11 short days. (Note: dates on calendar may be closer than they appear). They are all Firefly-inspired, and you can catch a glimpse of Kaylee (above) and Mal (below) here. Inara is the third, to follow. I love them.

July15-KayleeMalSocks

2. Finishing up a pair of Jaywalkers that have been on the needles and in my purse since April and I had sort of almost given up hope of finishing. But slow and steady wins in the end, and now I have another pair of Lorna’s Laces Jaywalkers (9th? 10th pair?) in ‘Montrose’, to add to the sock drawer.

July15-JaywalkersMontrose

3. Being really frustrated that I’m still not running. (Yes, I’ve started physiotherapy. No, this does not make me feel much better about having to cancel a 2nd half-marathon in 3 months.)

4. Cooking up some designs for the fall. Man, I love cables. (As does this Tanis Fiber Arts DK, in garnet. Man, I love garnet.)

July15-TanisDKcardi

5. Reviving a healthy obsession with Harry Potter inspired knitwear.

6. Preparing to head off this weekend for the Great North Woods, or more accurately, the Haliburton School of the Arts, where I’ll be teaching a week long workshop starting Monday, on sweater knitting. I basically love everything about sweaters, and though I am filled with equal parts delight and anxiety over teaching a week long workshop for the first time, I think probably the delight will win, since sweaters are awesome. (And usually so are knitters).

Catch you next time! And in case I’m gone all week, as my friend Jane likes to say, kids, don’t burn down the internet while I’m away.

Happy knitting!

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Filed under design, finished object, finished object: socks, socks, sweaters

Summer logic

I think if one so happens to be sitting down to knit with a shiny, pink, girly-ish sort of skein of yarn, then one should definitely also have a pink, girly-ish sort of drink to go with it.

June15-KayleeSocks

I mean, that’s just the only reasonable thing to do.
Right?

I thought so.

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Filed under design, socks

Stop the madness

There will come a day, hopefully one day very soon, when I am not stubbornly transfixed by selecting colour combinations of Knit Picks Palette for potential colour-work designing. I am very sorry to announce that so far, today is not that day.

June13-Palette

I keep endlessly shuffling them around, deciding “okay this time for sure” that I’ve got it, swatching it up, then not being entirely happy with it and trying again. I think that this time I might have it…but then check in again tomorrow morning and we’ll see about that.

June13-Palette2

This weekend as a change of pace from that, and distraction from the fact that I am still not back onto running and need to figure out what the hip woes are actually all about (show me a runner who can’t run and I will show you the dictionary definition of the word “miserable”), I allowed myself to be kidnapped by knitters into the city. On Friday it was ‘Drunken Knitters’, a monthly gathering of Toronto knitters in a pub, which I always mean to come in for and almost never actually do. Just in case any of you think I am the only one cracked enough to take on colour-work or lace while under the influence, I can reassure you there were knitters present doing both of these. This includes Michelle, who was working away on stranded mittens on 2.0mm needles, and pausing between sips of Guinness to pet her progress happily.

June10-DrunkenKnitters

I hung out some more at Lisa’s and got some free kitty cuddles, visited the Purple Purl, and knitted a bit. I met up with Jane who, fresh from a visit to the camera store for new toys, stuck a hat on my head and took pictures of it. As one does, when one hangs out with knitters.

June11-JanePhotos

June11-Socks

When next we meet, I hope to have solved the colour decision, or at least have moved on to another set of knitting decisions. Happy knitting! Keep the yarn close by.

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Filed under colour-work, design

Well, it’s speedier, at least

I’ve been doing a bit of swatching this week, toying with some design ideas and playing around with colours and options. Which is also a sort of professional-looking way of saying “I’m sitting in an indecisive mess of yarn,” but then, as Annie tells me, a creative mess is better than tidy idleness, so I’ll take it.

June8-Swatching3

As I am wont to do, I’m looking at colour-work and twisted stitch cables. I have been wanting to start on some more sweaters of my own using these techniques, and finally have a bit of time to sit in the mess to do it. And then I remembered what both of these things have in common, which is how annoying it is to work them flat. Well, for me, at least. I know there are people who love doing stranded colour-work flat and don’t mind purling back in 2 colours at all, but me, I’d rather do it in the round and steek that sucker. Similarly, twisted stitch cables, or any combination of stitches worked as knits ‘through the back loop’, are a heck of a lot more fun on the knit side since purling through the back loop tends to involve mildly contorting your wrists. Ergo, I prefer it in the round if I can help it. (See: almost every sock pattern I’ve designed, ever.)

The simplest way to swatch for a project you’re going to do in the round is to do a full swatch in the round, say on DPNs or a small circular needle. Or, as knitters like Elizabeth Zimmerman and others with a voice of experience have advocated, knit a hat. It’s more useful than a swatch in the long term, and bound to fit someone when it’s done, and then you have both a hat and all your gauge information in one fell swoop. Of course, this also means taking the time and yarn quantity required for a full in-the-round undertaking, which you may not want to commit to at the time. You might actually just want a flat swatch’s worth of time and yarn. So, then, this is when you break out the ‘speed swatch’ approach. I did a whole mess of these back when I was deciding on a colour-scheme for my Venezia pullover, though at the time I didn’t know that’s what they were called and just sort of thought of them as ‘a sort of cop-out way of swatching in the round but not really.’

June8-Swatching4

What you do here is cast on enough stitches to get you a decent amount of fabric – say, 5-6 inches worth – onto a circular needle, and as you work through the swatch, when you get to the end of a row you just slide the whole works back to the front of the needle sort of like the carriage-return on a type-writer. (A circular needle is both flexible in the middle and pointy at both ends, which is why this works. Circular needles: not just for circular knitting any more!) The effect is that you are only ever knitting the Right Side of the work, so you will get a gauge reading similar to what you will actually have when knitting in the round, since knitting in the round will also only require you to work the Right Side.

The other effect is that the wrong side of your swatch will look like a big ol’ mess, since every time you start back at the beginning of the row, you leave a trail of yarn behind.

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Once you’ve done the amount of swatching you feel comfortable with, you cast off as per usual, and then get out the scissors and snip those yarny strings at the back, and then you have a flat swatch. Provided your swatch is not 100% non-wool, the strands will not unravel at the sides very quickly and you’ll be fine.

June8-Swatching1

This also works well for just plain stockinette if all you want to do is avoid the process of going in the round – say, for a sock. DPNs would work well enough in place of a circular needle, if they’re long enough to handle what you want to cast on.

When you’re done, there is naturally still the question of what to do with the swatch once you’ve finished it and gotten your gauge reading and had your way with it and don’t need it any more. But everyone likes knitted coasters, right? I thought so.

Happy swatching!

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Filed under design, swatching

Month’s end

Folks, I say this every month, but this time I honestly do have no real clue as to how the time has managed to pass so quickly. How is it possible that tomorrow it will be June? Many parts of me are in full on rejection mode about this. Especially the parts of me that are recoiling in horror at the 40C+ humidex that is already climbing in. Now really, a knitter needs a bit more time to adjust to this sort of thing. Especially when said knitter happens to be knitting a wool/silk pullover. (One could also argue that said knitter should really have moved on to the lace silk shawl already, instead, and one might be sort of right about that, but one would also have to deal with said knitter’s stubbornness. So.)

I’ve been busy enough behind the scenes here, keeping up with my running (and now with some rest after over-doing my poor hip, WOE is me), getting busy with some new designs for later this summer and the fall, and generally trying to get with a new routine. Speaking of catching up with a few things, though…

1. The TTC Knitalong (Calling Toronto-area knitters!) is happening yet again, with many excited knitters already planning to descend on the city, knit their way through the streets, streetcars, and subways, and converge with lots of happy purchases and chatter. If you’d like to sign up, do so quickly, since spots do sometimes fill up quickly on some of the teams! Have a 2nd or 3rd choice ready! I’m planning on volunteering along with one of the North teams if all goes well, since that’s a route I haven’t sat in on before. But they all promise yarn and good times.

2. In March I promised you that I would donate proceeds from my pattern sales to charity, in light of ongoing relief efforts in Japan and around the world. And although I mentioned the results of this on my Twitter feed, somehow it got away from my blog and I would be remiss not to finally report to you that, thanks to your purchases and a bit of my own top-up, I donated $400 to charity, split evenly between the Red Cross and Doctors Without Borders. Thank you for your generosity, dear knitters!

3. In knitting progress news, I am pleased to report that my Silk Garden Hourglass sweater now has both two sleeves AND a body, and is moving along swiftly on the yoke. I’d hoped that I might have it done this month, but that does seem a bit less likely now given that, at the time of reporting, the month only has about six and a half hours left in it.

May31-NoroHourglass

Still, I am enjoying it. I ran into a bit of a fretful moment on the weekend when I realized I was down to my 2nd last ball of the darker colourway, but still had 3 more of the brighter one. Happily, I also happened to be hanging out with Lisa’s kitties on the weekend (cute kitty picture included below, for reference – new wee Athena, and Greedo), and her place is close to Passionknit, and they had a veritable wall of Silk Garden choices. Now that I have procured 2 extra skeins, I am sure this means I will now manage to squeak by to the very last yard of the original set of yarn, and not need them at all, but one does always want to be prepared to meet that eventuality with some reinforcements at the ready. Thankfully, Silk Garden is always useful to hang around the yarn stash.

May27-Kitties

4. I’ve been doing a bit of pattern updating, and am happy to announce that my Lamplight Shawl is now available in wide release, both in my Ravelry store and on Patternfish. I did this pattern last year for The Sweet Sheep, and the larger version (very cozy, or so I think) uses one of her Soft Spun Super Skeins, which are wonderful in that you can get an entire big shawl out of one and never have to stop to join skeins or weave in ends.

Aug22-Shawl5

5. Sock Summit Registration happened – and I am pleased to have snagged a few classes once again! I’ll be knitting with Cat Bordhi, Cookie A, and Franklin Habit. It will be a great bit of vacation and visiting and knitting and learning (um, and maybe shopping) and general merriment. Will any of you be there as well?

Happy knitting! Catch you next month. (ha!)

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Filed under design, knitting in public, sweaters, Uncategorized

It’s both, damnit

Last Saturday during my Toronto day, I met up with Austen for lunch and knitting time, and among other things the conversation drifted towards that ubiquitous question of being a process knitter or a product knitter. She came down firmly on the side of product knitting, for herself – she wants the finished thing, to wear and use and immediately integrate into her wardrobe. I agreed that I have product knitter tendencies, though often in a very different way. I always want to be able to wear the finished thing, but mostly I want to just finish the thing; I like having it done and knowing that it is complete, successful, and something to check off my list as done before being able to move onto something else. (Side note: maybe what I really love isn’t the Finished Product feeling, but the Being Able To Start A New Project feeling? Hmm.)

But at the same time, I can’t shrug off the process. I love knitting, and I especially love knitting that isn’t boring. I need to reach for something that’s going to engage my mind in some way, even if it’s a repeating 2-row pattern or a ribbed sock that makes me stop and work heels and toes every so often. I like knitting that asks a little something of me.

I mean, why else would I not only design a pattern with stabby twisty tiny cables for Kim’s Buffy the Vampire Slayer yarn, but then go on to knit the pattern not once, not twice, but three times? That’s definitely process and product working together. I love working the cables, but darn it all I want to show them off, too.

April15-Staked3b

It’s true. I did one as a test sample, one as the real sample, and then this third pair here as a variation. In the pattern instructions I let people know that one way to modify the sock is to omit the swooshy diagonal across the instep, and simply continue the leg cable chart all the way down the front of the foot. It produces a more classic look and is possible a bit more versatile for both men and women looking for some cabled sock action. So I decided to actually go ahead and do that myself, and snagged another skein of Kim’s Merino Sock (you can’t have just one), and cast on. This deep purple is lovingly named ‘Edward Discovers Wood Chippers Make Excellent Juicers.’

April15-Staked4d

Same delicious stake-through-the-heart cables as in the original pattern, just more of them to love. And they are toasty and comfy to wear. I’m glad I finally got around to sewing up the toes on these babies, because spring’s the perfect time to show off new socks – no longer buried under boots, but still cool enough to need the layer.

As luck and timing would have it, the pattern is now available not just to Indigodragonfly club members (I did this pattern for the October 2010 installment), but in the form of a kit. (The pattern will be available individually through wide release in my Ravelry and Patternfish stores, as of June 15th.)

No matter what you’re knitting on this weekend, I hope you enjoy both product and process! Happy Friday.

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Filed under cables, design, finished object: socks

Catch-all

1. A few days after working up all the finishing on the Dusseldorf Aran, I finally gave it a bath and laid it out for drying/blocking. But it is still a wool/alpaca sweater drying in a basement apartment, and is thusly taking approximately twelve thousand years to do this. (Or, possibly, 2 days instead of just 1.)

2. Now that the club members have had a couple of weeks head start in getting their packages in the mail, it’s safe to blog about the sock design I did for the Tanis Fiber Arts ‘year in colour’ yarn club. And in fact, Tanis lovingly beat me to the punch!

April14-MarchingOn2

It’s her Purple Label cashmere sock, in a club colourway called ‘Clover’. At the time that she handed the skein off to me, though, it was simply labelled as ‘March’, as that was its calendar designation. It’s funny how the yarn name works in combination with the colour, though, because as I pondered the colour during the winter months I just kept thinking March March March March, green Marchy goodness… And I knew the idea I wanted to bring to it, it was just a matter of fine-tuning in execution until I got what I wanted. Bright, leafy, viney, knotty socks were just the ticket – and a reminder that spring does return, and winter does in fact, recede. I called them ‘Marching On’.

April14-MarchingOn

3. Not that I’m enabling you or anything, but you can sign up for Tanis’ yarn club at any time in 2011, and you’ll get all the past subscription installments of the year when you sign up. (In 2012, all the patterns revert to designers and you can still have a crack at them even if you weren’t in the club).

4. At the very moment that Tanis was blogging about the socks on Saturday, I was in fact, going 2-for-2 on Saturday knitter encounters in Toronto. As I breezed through the Eaton Centre, Natalie was doing the same thing and we chatted and laughed for a bit. She was even in the presence of cute hand-knits, though believe me it was actually warm enough (finally) that we could genuinely consider ditching them. Hard to believe that time of year is on the horizon!

April9-Natalie

5. Speaking of yarn clubs, if you’re looking for snarky smart-ass yarn clubs, there’s still time to sign up for Kim’s over at Indigodragonfly Yarns. I can personally verify the quality of said snark content is 100%.

Happy Thursday! And happy knitting.

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Filed under accessories, design, finished object: socks

On the subject of things that are challenging

 

Mar11-Staked3

In the mean time, I’ve been spending a bit of thought and energy going back to the whole technique of cabling without a cable needle. It’s a favourite technique of mine, knitting-wise, and one that I use and encourage a great deal through my designs. (Hint: I am probably not stopping with the cables in the designs, any time soon.) And I directly point out how this works in this blog post from the fall, with a step-by-step set of photos demonstrating a left-leaning and right-leaning cable.

I don’t think everyone needs to know how to do this, in the same way that I don’t think that any kind of technique is required knowledge for knitting. We are all capable people and we do things as we please, and there is rarely only one single way of accomplishing something in knitting world. But I do think that being able to do this greatly increases your chances of working cables efficiently and quickly, if you don’t have to reach for the cable needle every single time, especially if you are working a pattern that asks you to work several cable twists over a row, every other row. (Um, not that I would know anything about that. Heh. ::coughcough::) And this is one way of working cables that I like a lot.

There are a few basic steps to this that have to do with what cables are and how they are constructed, that may help you to wrap your head around this technique in case you are still struggling with it.

1. All cables or cable twists involve 2 things:
a) the addition of a twist or directional turn in the knitting, that moves one or more stitches in one direction, in the foreground of the work, over top of one or more stitches that move in the opposite direction, in the background of the work.

b) working the stitches in some combination of knitted and purl stitches. In the cases where all stitches are knitted, this is usually referred to as a cable, i.e. C4L is a cable twist leaning to the left over 4 sts, where all sts are knitted. T4L is a cable twist leaning to the left, involving knitted stitches leaning to the left over a background of purl sts.

Some examples of cable notations that all lean to the right might be like so:

Left Cables and Twists

And similarly, all of the following lean to the left:

Right Cables and Twists

In other words, the action of making the twist to the left or to the right is always the same, regardless of how many total sts are being worked. What may differ, however, is whether or not all the sts are worked as knits, or some as knits and some as purls. So…

2. This also means that, although I am working all of these in English style and not Continental (i.e. ‘throwing’ the yarn with the right hand instead of ‘picking’ with the left), you can work the twist like this regardless of whether you are an English or Continental knitter. Just do the twist in the required direction, then work the sts.

3. When you’re working this technique without a cable needle, the only thing that really matters is that you are working these steps in 1a and 1b in sequence: First you make the twist, then you work the sts according to the pattern.

So, all you need to ask yourself when working a cable is: Is this leaning to the left or to the right? And then; Which ones do I knit (or knit through the back loop – ktbl – as the case may be, as here), and which do I purl?

I decided to add to this whole cabling tutorial experience with a video demonstration, because as helpful as photos are, it’s easier for some people to simply see this live in 3D action. So I’ve taken the liberty of doing just that, and as it turns out I like to blather about this so much that I had to divide it up into 3 segments. Part 1 (above) involves some general explanation of the cables and twists (as I do some of here in this post), and also demonstrates a right-leaning cable.

Part 2 (below) adds to the demo by showing several right-leaning and left-leaning cables and twists. All of these are over 2 sts, but the technique would be the same for cables over 4 or 6 sts. After about 8 sts I jump back to the cable needle, it’s just easier that way. (Spoiler alert, in this clip you also see me fixing a couple of boo-boos as I go, re-knitting an unknitted stitch and so forth, from the RH needle. Knitting in front of a camera is tricky, yo.) I also refer to the need for a bit of relaxation while working this technique, to avoid a death grip and hand/arm strain.

And then, in Part 3 (below), I put this all together and just plain work a full needle’s worth of stitches including several cable twists to the left and to the right.

All of this asks you to be comfortable with having some sts that are temporarily live (off a needle). This can sometimes be a bit terrifying if you’re new to it, but it also happens pretty quickly. The worst that could happen is that you drop a stitch in the process, and heck, if you do that, all you have to do is go and remember your Knitting 101 and remember how to pick it up again. (See that? See how I calmly breezed past that? Lalalala you can too.)

Finally, because I know people might ask – I’m demonstrating all of this on a pair of Staked socks, and the pattern will be available from Indigodragonfly Yarns as a kit in mid-April, and as a wide release pattern from me in June. (I’ll be sure to let you know when that all happens.) Also, the knitting back in the background is one of Jennie Gee’s, happily snatched from the Knitty City booth at the Vogue Knitting Live event in NYC. I love her stuff.

Anyhoozle, there you have it. More endorsement for cabling without a cable needle. (And, um, probably not my last). Stay tuned until next time, when I may actually have more cabled knitting progress to report. Those sleeves on the Dusseldorf Aran aren’t going to knit themselves.

Happy knitting!

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Filed under cables, demo, design, fearless knitting, tutorial