Tag Archives: finished object

I take it all back

Privately I was very, very skeptical about the Noro Kureyon Sock. I’d heard about the complaints (primarily: “It’s too scratchy. There’s too much flotsam to pick out. It’s too thin.”) and just written it off as something I’d pass on in favour of waiting for the Noro Silk Garden Sock (Silk Garden is easily in my top 10 yarns ever). And then a few weeks ago at the Purple Purl Rochelle gifted me with a gift certificate, and I started staring at the pretty Noro colours, and before I knew it I’d put that gift certificate towards some Kureyon Sock.

And let me tell you, the colours, they WIN. Hands down. I take back all the trepidation I had. It’s just like knitting with very thin sheepswool – a little bit sticky, and softer the more you handle it and handwash it – and I didn’t notice enough veggie matter in my 2 skeins to write home about. Also, when you stripe 2 colourways together, you can do things like this:

NoroKH4

I love them. They fit like a dream. I knitted virtually nothing else but these while I was knitting them, and had them finished in just under 2 weeks. I had thought it would become tedious to keep switching colourways every 5 rows, but the effect was just the opposite. I loved seeing what shade would come up next and how the stripes would work out.

Project specs: Noro Knee-Highs
Yarn: Noro Kureyon Sock, #40 and #188
Needles: 2.25mm DPNs
Notes: I followed the same general approach that I documented here, and this time I made extra care to make them a little longer than I thought was long enough. I learned from my last pair of knee-socks that it is always better to err on the side of too long than too short, in both the leg and the foot. If the foot is too short, it will pull at the leg and the leg will become shorter, too. It also needs to be a little snug to stay up (at least 1.5 inches negative ease at the calf), and I knitted elastic thread into the cuff as is my preference.

With the Noro, I had about 20 grams of each skein left, and that was after I had yanked out several yards of each skein (in the #40, the olive green goes on for a WHILE, and it was starting to make the other colourway too obvious; In the #188, there is a part with yellow-flecked green that was making the combined colourways distractingly full-spectrum, so I yanked that out, too.) I used 1 colourway for the knee cuff/heel/toe, and the 2nd one for the cuff/heel/toe on the 2nd sock, to even the yarn quantities. In general, I think the 2 colourways one picks for a project like this have to be chosen carefully. They have to contrast enough to be obviously different, and yet if they are too different it will be distracting and disconcerting.

NoroKH2

At first I was very, very unsure about these. Depending what time you would have asked me, I would have said these were confusing/ugly/sexy/surprising/beautiful/the best thing ever knitted/the worst thing ever knitted. Now? I love them. I love them enough that I want to do another pair, it is just a matter of whether I will wait for the Silk Garden Sock or whether I’ll try another with the Kureyon Sock.

NoroKH3

Now my biggest problem is waiting out the summer until I can wear them for real. If only yarn lust were more seasonal.

Happy knitting, today and for the coming weekend!

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Filed under finished object: socks, socks

Shawl time

I was already enjoying the Forest Canopy shawl as I was knitting it. For real, I was only halfway through it and already thinking of what shawls I was going to make next, what other lace projects I’d filed away for “someday” in my knitting brain. Then, I blocked it. Yes my friends, blocking lace really is the most fun you can have with yarn and T-pins. I present to you my first lace shawl:

Canopy2

A few of my knitting friends have been working on this pattern lately, and when i realized it could be done with sock yarn, and that I could use the 2nd pair of skeins of Socks That Rock that I purchased at Rhinebeck (in the lovely semi-solid Jasper colourway, no less), I was sold. I cranked this out in about 2 weeks, and then inexplicably let it sit there for another week before blocking it.

Canopy4

The astute and experienced among you may notice that I didn’t quite get to a full border – I only managed 4 of the final border rows instead of 8, as I ran out of yarn. And indeed, I ran out of yarn after getting 80% of the way through the bind-off. Clearly, this is an indication that I over-shot and should have stopped 1 repeat short and done only 17 instead of 18 repeats of the main pattern. But you know? It totally works. Nobody who has examined this shawl has caught the 12 inches of substituted yarn I pinch-hitted the final bind-off with, and dudes, I call that a win. I have Kate’s yarn to thank for being the right shade.

Canopy3

I like that this pattern is easy to ‘embiggen’. Although it’s possible to complete the pattern with only a single 350-400 yd skein of fingering weight yarn, it’s pretty easy to just keep going and do more repeats until you feel like you’ve gone far enough. The finished size is about 78″ across, which is pretty much perfect for me (I’m 5’9″. Big comfy shawl, please). Great for wrapping around my shoulders in the heavily air-conditioned theatre on Friday night.

Canopy1

The STR Mediumweight makes this a less ‘holey’ knit than it is perhaps intended to be, and I probably could have gone up a needle size (I used 5.0mm) without trouble. Still, I call this a win and freely admit that there will be more shawls this summer. Shawls Ahoy. Summer of Shawls. I’ve got the patterns stacking up in my mental queue and have but to choose.

Lace knitting. Why didst I forsake thou for so long? Good thing I finally found you.

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Filed under finished object: shawl, lace, shawls

Finished but not Forgotten

Back in February when we were on our eleventy-billionth (numbers are approximate) snowfall of the season, I clung to bright and colourful knits. Casting on for something Fair Isle was just good prescriptive knitting at the time, never mind fun. But the Venezia pullover ended up taking top priority and so Glowing got pushed to the side, not to be finished until the end of April. I’ll have to wait until next fall and winter to take full advantage of this FO.

Glowing-FO-May20

Pattern: ‘Glowing’, by Fiona Ellis in Inspired Fair Isle Knits
Yarn: Mission Falls 1824 Wool, MC ‘Raspberry’, and several other CC colours. All yarn is to specification from the book, with the exception of the pale green shade – I substituted in the slightly cooler ‘Thyme’ shade instead of the ‘Pistachio’ which is a little more in the bright yellow area of green. I like the overall effect.
Needles: 5.5mm for the fair isle sections, 4.5mm for the plain stockinette.
Mods: I had to up-size the needles on the fair isle to get closer to gauge, and actually I think in the end I still came out sliiiiiiightly more snug on gauge than the pattern. The final product does fit, though, and I’m happy with that.

The major modification that I made was to add an extra row between the raglan decreases for several of the decreases, to add a bit more room in the shoulders. My row gauge was a bit too snug on the stockinette and I needed to make sure my arms and shoulders would still fit. This worked out well.

Glowing1

I’m pretty much in love with Mission Falls 1824 wool, after this project. There will be more sweaters with this in the future. It feels glorious to knit with, and the colours are so rich. I put it through the washer and dryer (YAY superwash), and you’d never know. Not a pill in sight. It is, however, a yarn that rewards swatching – stockinette does grow a little bit after it is washed and dried. I admit I was pretty much banking on this happening because my pre-wash gauge was more tight than it needed to be. (But the stranded sections did need to be closer to pattern gauge to start – colourwork does not stretch as much as plain stockinette).

The stranded sections really fly by on this, and are the most fun to work on. Usually I don’t mind stockinette because it’s mindless, but it was a long push to get the yoke finished once the body and sleeves were all done. I was glad to get to the hood – which is actually a decently functional hood, it covers my head when pulled up, and doesn’t come loose like the decorative hoods on so many other knits. Of course, that could also just be because I have a lot of curly hair to stuff under there…

GlowingFO2-May20

I must thank Steph for taking the photographs, and letting me finally put this FO up for the record. Since a hooded wool pullover isn’t quite what I need for summer, though, this will be taking up residence as a shop sample at the Purple Purl, until I can reclaim it again for the winter.

Have a great Tuesday!

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Filed under fair isle, finished object: sweater